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SENDIRÁÐ ÍSLANDS Í BERLÍN - ICELANDIC EMBASSY Project: 1996
Location: Rauchstrasse, Klingerhöfer-Dreieck Tiergarten, Berlin, Germany
Photographs: Christian Richter
Completion Year: 1996
Floor Area: 500 m²
Typology: -

Competition : Pálmar Kristmundsson and Gunnar B. Steffensson,

Realization: Pálmar Kristmundsson, Birgir Teitsson, Haraldur Ingvarsson and Sindri Gunnarsson

1st prize, invited competition

Consultants: IGH engineers Cologne, IGH engineers Berlin and Pysall + Ruge architekten Berlin

SENDIRÁÐ ÍSLANDS Í BERLÍN - ICELANDIC EMBASSYProject: 1996

Competition : Pálmar Kristmundsson and Gunnar B. Steffensson,

Realization: Pálmar Kristmundsson, Birgir Teitsson, Haraldur Ingvarsson and Sindri Gunnarsson

1st prize, invited competition

Consultants: IGH engineers Cologne, IGH engineers Berlin and Pysall + Ruge architekten Berlin

Location: Rauchstrasse, Klingerhöfer-Dreieck Tiergarten, Berlin, Germany
Photographs: Christian Richter
Completion Year: 1996
Floor Area: 500 m²
Typology: -

The Nordic embassy complex in Berlin is not only a manifestation of strong historical and cultural ties between the five neighbouring Nordic countries. The buildings are also exercises in national characteristics and an architectural embodiment of national aspirations. Visible from the entrance of the complex, the Icelandic embassy occupies a narrow site in the northwest part. Characterized by its Liparit 'Red Rhyotite) natural stone facade, the building actually consists of two parts, a -working unit- and a service unit". The entrance appears as a crack in the massive stone wall, opening a way into the building. Standing by the calm surface of the moat, the two parts of the building are separated by a divide that could be read as the gorge between the continental shelves that run across Iceland.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The characteristics of this project comes from the juxtaposition of materials - the Liparit and the grey concrete. The concrete is corrugated, alluding to the Icelandic tradition of cladding buildings in corrugated metal. The Liparit is a uniquely Icelandic material, Between the embassy building and the copper band that embraces the embassy complex there is a small atrium space, its ground being covered with lava stones that are lit up with red tight from below, as if still hot. One of the main concepts for the embassy was that it would be a representation of refined Icelandic design and craftsmanship The interior, as well as a much of the furniture, was designed by PK Arkitektar and manufactured in Iceland and imported for this project.